What happens if cancerous cells are found in cervix?

How do you get cancer cells on your cervix?

Long-lasting infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV is a common virus that is passed from one person to another during sex. At least half of sexually active people will have HPV at some point in their lives, but few women will get cervical cancer.

How long do you have to live if you have cervical cancer?

The chances of living for at least five years after being diagnosed with cervical cancer are: stage 1 – 80-99% stage 2 – 60-90% stage 3 – 30-50%

What happens if you have precancerous cells in cervix?

Precancerous conditions of the cervix are changes to cervical cells that make them more likely to develop into cancer. These conditions are not yet cancer. But if they aren’t treated, there is a chance that these abnormal changes may become cervical cancer.

Can cervical cancer be cured completely?

Cervical cancer is generally viewed as treatable and curable, particularly if it is diagnosed when the cancer is in an early stage. This disease occurs in the cervix, or the passageway that joins the lower section of the uterus to the vagina.

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What is the most common age to get cervical cancer?

Cervical cancer is most frequently diagnosed in women between the ages of 35 and 44 with the average age at diagnosis being 50 . It rarely develops in women younger than 20.

Is Stage 1 cervical cancer curable?

Following a staging evaluation, a stage I cancer is said to exist if the cancer is confined to the cervix. Stage I cervical cancer is curable for the majority of patients if surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy are appropriately used.

Can you live a long life after cervical cancer?

Survival for all stages of cervical cancer

more than 60 out of every 100 (more than 60%) will survive their cancer for 5 years or more after diagnosis. more than 50 women out of every 100 (more than 50%) will survive their cancer for 10 years or more after diagnosis.

Who is most at risk of developing cervical cancer?

Cervical cancer is more common among groups of women who are less likely to have access to screening for cervical cancer. Those populations are more likely to include Black women, Hispanic women, American Indian women, and women from low-income households. Oral contraceptives.