How common is death from cervical cancer?

What are the odds of dying from cervical cancer?

The 5-year survival rate for all people with cervical cancer is 66%. However, survival rates can vary by factors such as race, ethnicity, and age. For white women, the 5-year survival rate is 71%. For Black women, the 5-year survival rate is 58%.

How long do you live after being diagnosed with cervical cancer?

More than 90% of women with stage 0 survive at least 5 years after diagnosis. Stage I cervical cancer patients have a 5-year survival rate of 80% to 93%. Women with stage II cervical cancer have a 5-year survival rate of 58% to 63%.

Is cervical cancer leading cause of death?

Cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States. However, in the past 40 years, the number of cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths from cervical cancer have decreased significantly.

When was cervical cancer the leading cause of death?

Cervical cancer is the second most frequent cancer and the fifth most frequent cause of death from cancer among women in the world, with an estimated 471,000 new cases and 233,000 deaths in the year 2000.

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Can cervical cancer be cured completely?

Cervical cancer is generally viewed as treatable and curable, particularly if it is diagnosed when the cancer is in an early stage. This disease occurs in the cervix, or the passageway that joins the lower section of the uterus to the vagina.

Can you beat stage 4 cervical cancer?

Stage 4 cervical cancer is not curable in many cases. However, nearly 17 in 100 women will beat stage 4 cervical cancer.

What is the most common age to get cervical cancer?

Cervical cancer is most frequently diagnosed in women between the ages of 35 and 44 with the average age at diagnosis being 50 . It rarely develops in women younger than 20.

Can you live a long life after cervical cancer?

Survival for all stages of cervical cancer

more than 60 out of every 100 (more than 60%) will survive their cancer for 5 years or more after diagnosis. more than 50 women out of every 100 (more than 50%) will survive their cancer for 10 years or more after diagnosis.

Is Stage 4 cervical cancer terminal?

Cervical cancer that has spread to distant organs and bones is difficult to treat. Historically, patients with metastatic cervical cancer have been considered incurable and rarely survive more than a year or two.